2021

09.-12.

August

Ida-Virumaa

International camp: mire restoration at North-East Estonia (Feodori)

North-Eastern Estonia is a region of contrasts. It is the largest industrial (oil shale) region of Estonia, spiked with underground mines and ruined landscapes. Nevertheless, it is also the home to Alutaguse, which is the largest forestry region, and the newest National Park of Estonia. Furthermore, Alutaguse is the last refuge to the Estonian population of the Syberian flying squirrel (Pteromys volans). North-Eastern Estonia has an interesting combination of industrial mining towns from the Soviet era, small villages along the coast of Lake Peipus, and endless wilderness.
  • Sold out
soo taastamine

2021

13.-16.

August

Ida-Virumaa

International camp: mire restoration at North-East Estonia II (Feodori)

North-Eastern Estonia is a region of contrasts. It is the largest industrial (oil shale) region of Estonia, spiked with underground mines and ruined landscapes. Nevertheless, it is also the home to Alutaguse, which is the largest forestry region, and the newest National Park of Estonia. Furthermore, Alutaguse is the last refuge to the Estonian population of the Syberian flying squirrel (Pteromys volans). North-Eastern Estonia has an interesting combination of industrial mining towns from the Soviet era, small villages along the coast of Lake Peipus, and endless wilderness.
  • Sold out
soo taastamine
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Conservation holidays take place mainly in Estonian

The conservation holidays that are marked as "International" will take place in English. Other conservation holidays will take place in Estonian. Most of our group leaders speak English, so it is possible to join Estonian-speaking conservation holidays. However, one must take into account that local volunteers in the group will probably converse mainly in Estonian. If You have any questions, please contact talgukontor@elfond.ee.

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Conservation holidays

... are becoming more and more popular throughout the world. It’s a way of holidaying that combines recreational activities with much needed conservation work. ELF Conservation Holidays or talgud consist of voluntary conservation work, getting to know the area, a hike and meeting the local ranger or guide. Holidays normally lasts 3-5, but sometimes up to 10 days. Evening activities include camp-fires and saunas.

Booking

The descriptions are available in Estonian site. Modern online translation tools can be helpful for finding out more about the events. If you don't speak any Estonian, we advise you to contact us before booking a place.

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Frequently Asked Questions

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History of ELFi talgud

Estonian Fund for Nature (ELF) started organising voluntary activities on 2001. Since then we have held 666 events on different sites, with more than 11000 participants who contributed over 100 000 hours of work. Conservation holiday is called TALGUD in Estonian.

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